Monthly Archives: March, 2006

Tips To Prevent Identity Theft

A friend of mine was just a victim of Identity Theft. Someone got her my credit card number. They made 2 credit cards with her number on it and used these cards to charge $500 at Bed Bath and Beyond in Rockville, Md. At the same time (within 2 hours), they spent $500 at Walmart in Lakeland, FL. My friend discovered something was amiss when she went to use her card and it was declined.

The following is a memo from my friend’s attorney to his office staff:

1. The next time you order checks have only your initials (instead of first name) and last name put on them. If someone takes your checkbook, they will not know if you sign your checks with just your initials or your first name, but your bank will know how you sign your checks.

2. Do not sign the back of your credit cards. Instead, put “PHOTO ID REQUIRED.”

3. When you are writing checks to pay on your credit card accounts, DO NOT put the complete account number on the “For” line. Instead, just put the last four numbers. The credit card company knows the rest of the number, and anyone who might be handling your check as it passes through all the check processing channels won’t have access to it.

4. Put your work phone # on your checks instead of your home phone. If you have a P.O. Box, use that instead of your home address. If you do not have a P.O. Box, use your work address.

5. Never have your SS# printed on your checks. (DUH!) You can add it if it is necessary. But if you have it printed, anyone can get it.

6. Place the contents of your wallet on a photocopy machine. Do both sides of each license, credit card, etc. You will know what you had in your wallet and all of the account numbers and phone numbers to call and cancel. Keep the photocopy in a safe place. I also carry a photocopy of my passport when travel either here or abroad.

We’ve all heard horror stories about fraud that’s committed on us in stealing a name, address, Social Security number, credit cards. Unfortunately I, an attorney, have firsthand knowledge because my wallet was stolen last month. Within a week, the thieve(s) ordered an expensive monthly cell phone package, applied for a VISA credit card, had a credit line approved to buy a Gateway computer, received a PIN number from DMV to change my driving record information online, and more.

But here’s some critical information to limit the damage in case this happens to you or someone you know:

1. We have been told we should cancel our credit cards immediately. But the key is having the toll free numbers and your card numbers handy so you know whom to call. Keep those where you can find them.

2. File a police report immediately in the jurisdiction where your credit cards, etc., were stolen. This proves to credit providers you were diligent, and this is a first step toward an investigation (if there ever is one).

But here’s what is perhaps most important of all: (I never even thought to do this.)

3. Call the 3 national credit reporting organizations immediately to place a fraud alert on your name and Social Security number. I had never heard of doing that until advised by a bank that called to tell me an application for credit was made over the Internet in my name. The alert means any company that checks your credit knows your information was stolen, and they have to contact you by phone to authorize new credit.

By the time I was advised to do this, almost two weeks after the theft, all the damage had been done. There are records of all the credit checks initiated by the thieves’ purchases, none of which I knew about before placing the alert. Since then, no additional damage has been done, and the thieves threw my wallet away. This weekend someone turned it in. It seems to have stopped them dead in their tracks.Now, here are the numbers you always need to contact about your wallet, etc., has been stolen:

1.) Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
2.) Experian (formerly TRW): 1-888-397-3742
3.) Trans Union: 1-800-680-7289
4.) Social Security Administration (fraud line): 1-800-269-0271

This all makes good sense and we are glad to be able to share it with you. So, please protect yourself!

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What Is Your Okemo Mountain Home Really Worth?

A new website claims to give the numbers in Okemo Mountain and beyond. Wherever you live, if you plan to buy or sell a home, one of the most important pieces of information you will need is the home’s current value in reasonably accurate terms. Zillow.com is a new national website that purports to be able to tell you that so that you – uh – won’t need a Realtor like me.

Well, I just read a good post on this by my friend Margaret Rome in Baltimore, Maryland and want to share it with you. It really says it all: “In the last few days, a new Web site launched with great fanfare but spotty performance. When CNN included a story about it on their evening news, the site couldn’t keep up with the hits. Why all the fuss? Zillow promises to give homebuyers and sellers up to date and complete information about the value of their home and comparables in their area.

Some have suggested this will make real estate agents obsolete because people will be able to price their own homes to be competitive. The early returns are that the site’s information is incomplete and sometimes wrong, which makes the suggested price ranges they give hard to justify. In some cases, the range is optimistically high, and for others, I’ve negotiated sales higher than their top amount.

The site depends on public records for its data. But public records will not show factors, like recent additions and improvements or the condition of the interior, that affect price. Public records can also be wrong; a friend of mine checked her house and said she wants that fireplace she’s supposed to have, but will not give up the second bathroom they didn’t count. If the information about a house is wrong, how valid is the price estimate? In time, the site will undoubtedly improve, but for now – caution.

There is no question about real estate agents becoming an endangered species because of this or any other site. Price is only one factor in buying or selling your home, and getting to the settlement table means avoiding traps and overcoming obstacles. A top agent will be experienced at:
negotiating the terms of your contract,
making sure only qualified buyers troop through your home,
meeting and dealing with appraisers, and
working with home inspectors and title companies to be sure you are protected from start to finish.

Buying or selling a home is an emotionally-charged transaction. Now more than ever it pays to have an experienced professional on your side. Embrace the benefits of new technology, but don’t fall into the trap of believing it will replace market knowledge and personal service.
The end of real estate agents? Not any time soon. Margaret”

Visit Margaret Rome’s Blog here.

I am glad to provide you with a complete, accurate home evaluaton. Click here for your no-obligation report.

Chester Rental

Chester Rental – Large 1 bedroom apt. on second floor – $625 per month, includes heat, hot water, trash and snow removal. No Pets! 1st, last and security required – credit check and references. Available May 1, 2006

Land in Cavendish

Land in Cavendish
Small lot across the street from the Black River – bring your fishing pole. $29,900.

Springfield

Springfield
Perfect for the first time homeowner: 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 acres of land, fenced yard, deck in back – newer home. $124,900.

Plymouth Home

Plymouth
Location! Price! Views – End unit 3 bedroom, 2 bath condo located between Okemo Killington, updated 2003, low maintenance fees – priced to sell: $139,900.

Buying A Home…Investment or Emotion?

Buying A Home…Investment or Emotion?

Hi. I have exciting news that I couldn’t wait to share with you! Industry experts are reporting that right now, we as a people are optimistic about the future, and our confidence is reflected in the ongoing health of the residential real estate market, especially in Vermont. What this means is that this is a perfect time to be buying or selling a home.

Robert J. Bruss, nationally recognized Real Estate attorney and syndicated columnist, in his article “12 Ways To Earn Your First Profit When You Buy” says, “Treat every real estate purchase, especially houses, as an investment rather than an emotional purchase. …it is very difficult to buy your personal residence without becoming emotionally involved. But the smartest homebuyers treat home purchases as both a place to live and a long-term investment.”

I am pleased to be able to share my experience with my clients. I have developed expertise in finding sound investment properties that can also feel like home. My clients have found it helpful to have someone to guide them in their process of buying and selling homes.
I would like to be your REALTOR for life. To do this, I have to be at the top of my profession. I believe that you will find this to be the case.

As always, if I can answer any real estate questions for you, I would be happy to have you call, 802-226-8022 or e-mail, Irene@ISellVermontRealEstate.com. And please visit my website for all your Vermont real estate needs.