Monthly Archives: April, 2009

Buying Rutland VT Real Estate: Factors Deciding Credit Score

dollar-houseIf you are buying Rutland VT real estate, you will want to know what your credit score is. Lenders look at your credit history, debt-to-income ratio and your credit score when qualifying you for a home loan. Credit scores range between 200 and 800, with scores above 620 considered desirable for obtaining a mortgage. The following factors affect yourscore:

1. Your payment history. Did you pay your credit card obligations on time? If they were late, then how late? Bankruptcy filing, liens, and collection activity also impact your history.

2. How much you owe.  If you owe a great deal of money on numerous accounts, it can indicate that you are overextended. However, it’s a good thing if you have a good proportion of balances to total credit limits.

3. The length of your credit history. In general, the longer you have had accounts opened, the better. The average consumer’s oldest obligation is 14 years old, indicating that he or she has been managing credit for some time, according to Fair Isaac Corp., and only one in 20 consumers have credit histories shorter than 2 years.

4. How much new credit you have. New credit, either installment payments or new credit cards, are considered more risky, even if you pay them promptly.

5. The types of credit you use. Generally, it’s desirable to have more than one type of credit – installment loans, credit cards, and a mortgage, for example.

For more on evaluating and understanding your credit score, visit www.myfico.com

Are you thinking of buying Rutland VT real estate. Learn about the home buying process at ISellVermontRealEstate.com or give me a call for more personal service, 800-659-1819 . 

Search all Rutland VT real estate and homes for sale.

 

Reprinted from Realtor Magazine with permission of the National Association of Realtors.

Just Listed in Ludlow Vermont

70-main-street-010

Wonderful renovated Office building on Main Street Ludlow.  Was Doctors office, now just waiting for your ideas.  First floor has reception area, plus 4 offices, upstairs 1 cute and comfy office.  This property was updated 7 years ago and has many uses – plenty of off street parking – walk outside and see Okemo Mountain.  This was once a single family home and is zoned res/comm.  Don’t miss this opportunity!  Just think about it – work and play at Okemo!

450 Ideas To Help Sell Your Rutland and Okemo Mountain VT Home Faster

ebook-coverYou will want to be as prepared as possible when you place your Rutland VT home on the market. I offer a FREE eBook, 450 Ideas…To Help Sell Your Home Faster, which tackles important issues you need to know to make your Rutland VT home competitive in today’s tough real estate market.

Through these 450 Ideas you will learn how to capitalize on your investment, reduce stress, be in control of your situation, and make the most profit possible.

You’ll discover how to avoid financial disappointment or worse, a financial disaster when selling your Rutland Vt home. Using a common sense approach, you get the straight facts about what can make or break the sale of your home.

You owe it to yourself to learn how these important tips will give you the competitive edge to get your Rutland VT home sold fast and for the most amount of money.

Simply click here, fill out the form and your FREE eBook, 450 Ideas…To Help Sell Your Home Faster, will be emailed to you.

Rutland, Okemo Mountain VT Home Sellers – Should I Take First Offer?

keys21Many Rutland VT home sellers look at the first offer on their home as just that, the First Offer with many more to come. You know what they say, ‘A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.’ And in the current Buyers Market, offers are few and far between. Rutland VT home sellers will want to consider the first offer very seriously. Here are reasons why: 

  • An early offer (if you’re lucky!) doesn’t necessarily mean buyers are lining up to follow suit. It could just mean that your home meets the needs or preferences of that one particular buyer who made the offer.
  • Your home will get the most interest from buyers just after it goes on the market. The longer it stays on the market, the more “desperate” buyers will think you are, prompting lower and lower offers.
  • Even if the first offer is thousands lower than your list price, consider carefully whether it might be enough — in terms of price and contract terms — before rejecting it out of hand. After all, the longer your home is on the market, the more it costs you in mortgage payments, taxes, insurance, upkeep and sheer inconvenience.
  • If the offered price and contract terms are less than ideal, start negotiations by making a counteroffer, being as flexible with the terms as possible. It isn’t uncommon for buyers to offer a price below what they are truly willing to pay, sometimes much below, just to see if they can buy under market.

An offer indicates serious interest in your home — don’t underestimate that but don’t take it for granted, either.

Thinking of selling your Rutland VT home? We’ll be happy to work with you to fine-tune your home’s listing price so it fits our local market. We can also advise you on what would make your home more saleable at low cost to you. Most importantly, we can put our expertise to work for you when it comes time to negotiate with potential buyers. Learn more about us by visiting ISellVermontRealEstate.com

Get the value of my Rutland VT home.

10 Questions To Ask Ludlow and Rutland Home Inspectors

inspectionBefore buying your next Ludlow or Rutland Vermont home, you should have the home inspected by a professional. An inspection can alert you to potential problems with a property and allow you to make an informed decision. Ask these questions to prospective South Central Vermont home inspectors:

1. Will your inspection meet recognized standards? Ask whether the inspection and the inspection report will meet all state requirements and comply with a well-recognized standard of practice and code of ethics, such as the one adopted by the American Society of Home Inspectors or the National Association of Home Inspectors. Customers can view each group’s standards of practice and code of ethics online at Ashi.org or Nahi.org. ASHI’s Web site also provides a database of state regulations.

2. Do you belong to a professional home inspector association? There are many state and national associations for home inspectors, including the two groups mentioned in No. 1. Unfortunately, some groups confer questionable credentials or certifications in return for nothing more than a fee. Insist on members of reputable, nonprofit trade organizations; request to see a membership ID.

3. How experienced are you? Ask how long inspectors have been in the profession and how many inspections they’ve completed. They should provide customer referrals on request. New inspectors also may be highly qualified, but they should describe their training and let you know whether they plan to work with a more experienced partner.

4. How do you keep your expertise up to date? Inspectors’ commitment to continuing education is a good measure of their professionalism and service. Advanced knowledge is especially important in cases in which a home is older or includes unique elements requiring additional or updated training.

5. Do you focus on residential inspection? Make sure the inspector has training and experience in the unique discipline of home inspection, which is very different from inspecting commercial buildings or a construction site. If your customers are buying a unique property, such as a historic home, they may want to ask whether the inspector has experience with that type of property in particular.

6. Will you offer to do repairs or improvements? Some state laws and trade associations allow the inspector to provide repair work on problems uncovered during the inspection. However, other states and associations forbid it as a conflict of interest. Contact your local ASHI chapter to learn about the rules in your state.

7. How long will the inspection take? On average, an inspector working alone inspects a typical single-family house in two to three hours; anything significantly less may not be thorough. If your customers are purchasing an especially large property, they may want to ask whether additional inspectors will be brought in.

8. What’s the cost? Costs can vary dramatically, depending on your region, the size and age of the house, and the scope of services. The national average for single-family homes is about $320, but customers with large homes can expect to pay more. Customers should be wary of deals that seem too good to be true.

9. What type of inspection report do you provide? Ask to see samples to determine whether you will understand the inspector’s reporting style. Also, most inspectors provide their full report within 24 hours of the inspection.

10. Will I be able to attend the inspection? The answer should be yes. A home inspection is a valuable educational opportunity for the buyer. An inspector’s refusal to let the buyer attend should raise a red flag. 

Are you a Ludlow or Rutland Vermont home buyer with questions concerning home inspections? Give me a call. I’m happy to answer all your questions. Also, visit ISellVermontRealEstate.com to learn more about buying a Ludlow home. 

Information is courtesy of Realtor Magazine with permission by the National Association of Realtors.